How Young Is Too Young? The Right Age To Get Tattoos, Revealed!
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How Young Is Too Young? The Right Age To Get Tattoos, Revealed!

Despite the growing popularity of getting inked, there is still one question that plays around in everyone's mind. What age is the right age to get a tattoo? 

Tattoo culture is blowing up in a way that no one expected it to. Seeing ink on someone's skin is something that is now relatively common. Tattoos have slowly become more accepted in our evolving society, with recent surveys revealing the fact that 38 percent of young people aged between 18 to 29 have at least one tattoo. Despite the growing popularity of getting inked, there is still one question that plays around in everyone's mind. What age is the right age to get a tattoo? 

 Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pixabay

In most states, it is illegal to tattoo a minor without the permission of their parents. But there are a few others who outright ban tattooing minors unless it is for a medical purpose, such as markers that are placed for radiation therapy. Many would defend a minor getting inked as a way of self-expression. But experts argue that allowing a minor to get tattooed could have its own setbacks. Let's look into a couple of reasons as to why allowing people younger than 18 to get inked is a bad idea. 

Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pexels

1. A lack of power of reasoning

Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pexels

Human beings take a while to develop rational thinking. This is mainly because the frontal cortex, which is the area of the brain that helps us control our reasoning and enables us to think before we act develops much later. This part of the brain takes its time to mature and continues to change well into adulthood. So in a sense, they don't think before they act, which can be a bad thing in many cases. 

2. Indulging in risky behavior

Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pexels

Since teenagers are still building their reasoning skills, there's a high chance of them indulging in a lot of risk-taking without weighing out the consequences. They often don't think of how the tattoo would bode for them in the future, and as a result, end up with a tattoo that they could regret later on. A survey conducted by Casino.org revealed that 43 percent of people with a tattoo that they regret had jumped to the decision without really thinking about it. 

3. A shift in perspective

Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pexels

Since the brain is still in its developmental stages, the chances of a minor later on hating the tattoo they got doesn't come as a surprise. It's human nature to change one's mind, but with tattoos, there's a lot of rational thought that needs to go behind it before getting oneself inked. The same survey by Casino.org revealed that 56 percent of the interviewed subjects changed the way they felt about their tattoos. 

4. Growing into that identity struggle

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We all fondly remember out angsty teenage days. It's a real thing, teenage angst. Many minors act out as they make their way to adulthood, but that's because this is the stage during with a human being begins trying to figure out who they are, what the world is, building new relationships along the way. Looking for an identity is a part of an individual's development, and that goes on until their early 20s. 

5. Misinformation can be bad

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Risky behavior can result in terrible things when it involves teenagers and tattoos. Teens, especially in the case of minors, are susceptible to peer pressure, which can push them to do things that they aren't always comfortable with, but still execute with the hopes of winning the respect and attention of their friends. It's a part of human nature to go with the flow, but that can be a disadvantage at times. 

6. A rebel with a cause

Picture for representational purposes only. Source: Pexels

The reason teenagers are always arguing with their parents is that their brain begins to synthesize information into ideas. They're putting this into practice in order to figure out their core identity. Retaliation is a minor's way to tell the world that they're people too, but it can be a bad idea to let them follow through with the plan. 

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